Author photoCarolina Journal Print Columnists
John Hood

Email: jhood@johnlocke.org

John Hood is President and Chairman of the John Locke Foundation, a North Carolina think tank that issues policy studies, hosts dozens of events and training sessions each year, produces broadcast programs, and publishes Carolina Journal, a newspaper, website, and radio program with a monthly audience of nearly 200,000 North Carolinians. Hood helped to found JLF in 1989.

In addition to his duties at JLF, Hood is a syndicated columnist for the Winston-Salem Journal, High Point Enterprise, Gaston Gazette, Durham Herald-Sun, and newspapers in 50 other North Carolina communities. He also writes a monthly column, "Free & Clear," for Business North Carolina magazine.

Hood is a frequent guest on talk radio and serves as a weekly panelist on “NC Spin,” a political talk show broadcast on 16 television stations in Charlotte, Raleigh, Greensboro, Greenville, Wilmington, Asheville, and elsewhere. He also created “Carolina Journal Radio,” a weekly newsmagazine broadcast on 18 radio stations.

Hood is the author of six books. The most recent one is Our Best Foot Forward: An Investment Plan for North Carolina's Economic Recovery, published by JLF in 2012. The Raleigh News & Observer described Our Best Foot Forward as "loaded with data and interesting ideas" and concluded that it "makes valuable contributions to the policy debate in North Carolina."

In 2005, Praeger published Hood's Selling the Dream: Why Advertising is Good Business The industry publication Adweek raved that Selling the Dream offered “a refreshing argument” for the role advertising plays in benefiting consumers. Choice rated the book as “highly recommended,” concluding that “Hood provides a fascinating look into the world of advertising and beyond to support his view that advertising provides a societal good.”

Hood is also the author of Investor Politics (Templeton Press, 2001.) “John Hood has produced a timely and informative account of...the most significant demographic shift of this century — the rise of a shareholder democracy in America,” said Jack Kemp. National Review called Investor Politics “chock-full of interesting historical anecdotes, clever policy analysis, and surprising musings.”

In 1994-95, Hood was a Bradley Visiting Fellow at the Heritage Foundation, the nation’s premier conservative think tank. At Heritage, he researched and wrote a book entitled The Heroic Enterprise: Business and the Common Good (The Free Press, 1996). The Wall Street Journal praised Hood’s book for “demonstrating the nexus between market incentives and socially desirable outcomes” and for providing “an avalanche of examples of Adam Smith’s invisible hand at work in the modern corporation.”

In addition to these public-policy books, Hood has published two volumes of family history and is currently writing the biography of former North Carolina Gov. James G. Martin.

Hood writes and comments frequently on politics and policy issues for national media organizations, particularly National Review Online and its main blog “The Corner.” His articles have appeared in both magazines — such as Readers’ Digest, The New Republic, National Review, Military History, and Reason — and in newspapers, including The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and The Chicago Tribune. He’s been interviewed by, among other news media, The Washington Post, The New York Times, Time, Newsweek, CNN, CNBC, NBC Nightly News, and the Fox News Channel.

At JLF, Hood created the E.A. Morris Fellowship for Emerging Leaders, a yearlong program that prepares young North Carolinians for leadership roles in government, business, and nonprofits. The ranks of Morris Fellows include state lawmakers, local elected officials, entrepreneurs, business managers, professionals, educators, and citizen activists. Hood has also served on selection committees for other programs such as the Wildacres Leadership Initiative's William Friday Fellows and the German Marshall Fund's Marshall Memorial Fellowship.

Hood received his degree in journalism from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he founded a student magazine called The Carolina Critic in the mid-1980s that ultimately grew to encompass five campus editions (at UNC-Chapel Hill, N.C. State, UNC-Greensboro, UNC-Charlotte, and Wake Forest University). Hood currently serves as chairman of the Carolina Liberty Foundation, an independent nonprofit that provides financial support to conservative and libertarian student groups at Chapel Hill.

He is a Mecklenburg County native and currently resides in Wake County with his family.


Articles by John Hood

(4.16.14) Choice Program Deserves Defense
North Carolina’s political leaders are defending opportunity scholarships for at-risk and disabled students because it’s the right thing to do.


(4.14.14) No to Claptrap and Flimflam
If an economic-development guru is peddling something that sounds too good to be true, it probably isn’t true.


(4.11.14) FCC Should Let Markets Work
If the FCC wants to do something constructive about telecom innovation and competition, it should focus on freeing up spectrum for new entrants and investment.


(4.11.14) The Dix Hill Haggle
After years of scrambling and squabbling about the fate of the Dorothea Dix campus near downtown Raleigh, the two sides are finally doing the right thing.


(4.09.14) The State of the Senate Race
Both sides know very well that control of the U.S. Senate may well be determined in the Tar Heel State.


(4.07.14) FCC Should Let Markets Work
Past experience and common sense argue against governments leaping into areas best left for competitive markets and private enterprises to sort out.


(4.04.14) Start Up the Rural Economy
Rather than simply embarking on a new “buffalo hunt” for industrial prospects, North Carolina’s small towns and rural communities should focus on cultivating entrepreneurs.


(4.04.14) Don't Backtrack on School Reform
Liberal politicians, activists, and the teacher union may not like it, but the North Carolina General Assembly is not about to abandon its reform strategy for public education.


(4.02.14) Start Up the Rural Economy
Rather than simply embarking on a new “buffalo hunt” for industrial prospects, North Carolina’s small towns and rural communities should focus on cultivating entrepreneurs.


(3.31.14) Look B4U Leap 2
Relatively good economic performance in 2011, 2012, and 2013 doesn’t mean that North Carolina is destined to have good performance in 2014.


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