Author photoCarolina Journal Print Columnists
John Hood

Email: jhood@johnlocke.org

John Hood joined the Pope Foundation as president in January 2015. He is the former the President and Chairman of the John Locke Foundation. Hood helped found JLF in 1989 with the support of the Pope Foundation and served as its president from 1995 to 2014. He remains Chairman of the Board at JLF.

Since 1986, Hood has written a syndicated column on politics and public policy for North Carolina newspapers. It currently appears regularly in the Winston-Salem Journal, Durham Herald-Sun, Gaston Gazette, High Point Enterprise, and newspapers in 60 other communities. He also writes a monthly column, “Free & Clear,” for Business North Carolina magazine. Hood is a frequent guest on talk radio and serves as a weekly panelist on "NC SPIN," a political talk show broadcast on 16 television stations in Charlotte, Raleigh, Greensboro, Greenville, Wilmington, Asheville, and elsewhere. He also created "Carolina Journal Radio," a weekly newsmagazine broadcast on 18 radio stations.

Hood is the author of six books. The most recent one is Our Best Foot Forward: An Investment Plan for North Carolina’s Economic Recovery, published by JLF in 2012. Hood's other books include Selling the Dream (2005), Investor Politics (2001), The Heroic Enterprise: Business and the Common Good (1996), and two volumes of family history. He is currently writing the biography of former North Carolina Gov. James G. Martin.

Hood writes and comments frequently for national media outlets, particularly National Review and its blog "The Corner." His articles have appeared in both magazines ó such as Readers' Digest, The New Republic, Military History, and Reason ó and in newspapers, including The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and The Chicago Tribune. He's been interviewed by, among others, The Washington Post, The New York Times, CNN, CNBC, NBC, and Fox News.

At JLF, Hood created the E.A. Morris Fellowship for Emerging Leaders, a yearlong program that prepares young North Carolinians for leadership roles in government, business, and nonprofits. He also serves on the faculty of the N.C. Institute of Political Leadership, the board of the William Friday Fellowship, and the selection committee for the Marshall Memorial Fellowship.

Hood received his degree in journalism in 1988 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he founded a magazine called The Carolina Critic was eventually published on six university campuses. Hood currently serves as chairman of the Carolina Liberty Foundation, which provides financial support to conservative and libertarian student groups at Chapel Hill.

He is a Mecklenburg County native and currently resides in Wake County with his wife, two sons, and a stepdaughter.


Articles by John Hood

(1.28.15) State Still Outpaces Region
Ever since conservatives won majorities in the North Carolina General Assembly and began reducing taxes, spending, and state regulation, liberals have predicted doom.


(1.28.15) State Sill Outpaces Region
Ever since conservatives won majorities in the North Carolina General Assembly and began reducing taxes, spending, and state regulation, liberals have predicted doom.


(1.26.15) Free Speech Faces Threats
In a free society, the proper answer to speech you donít like is to speak yourself, individually or as part of your own voluntary associations.


(1.26.15) Free Speech Faces Threats
In a free society, the proper answer to speech you donít like is to speak yourself, individually or as part of your own voluntary associations.


(1.21.15) Burr in Obama's Saddle
During his two terms in the Senate, Richard Burr has been a workhorse, not a showhorse. So quite a few North Carolinians have formed no strong opinions about him.


(1.21.15) Burr in Obama's Saddle
During his two terms in the Senate, Richard Burr has been a workhorse, not a showhorse. So quite a few North Carolinians have formed no strong opinions about him.


(1.19.15) Read Tax Claims Skeptically
When you include all taxes together, the wealthiest 20 percent have tax burdens more than twice as large as a share of income than those of the poorest 20 percent.


(1.19.15) Read Tax Claims Skeptically
When you include all taxes together, the wealthiest 20 percent have tax burdens more than twice as large as a share of income as those of the poorest 20 percent.


(1.14.15) UNC Policy Draws Lawsuit
Within North Carolina, the lawsuit against racial preferences at Chapel Hill got some initial publicity and then faded from the headlines. You can expect it to return.


(1.14.15) UNC Policy Draws Lawsuit
Another wave of bad publicity and legal questions isnít what the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill needs. But thatís exactly what the school is getting.


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