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Paul Chesser

Email: pc@climatestrategieswatch.com

Special correspondent for the Heartland Institute, senior fellow for the Commonwealth Foundation (Pa.), associate fellow for the National Legal and Policy Center, and director of Climate Strategies Watch, which assesses the development of global warming policies in the states, and contributing editor for Carolina Journal. He served as associate editor for CJ from 2001 to 2007, after a year as editor for two weekly community newspapers in Greensboro and Raleigh. His articles have appeared in dozens of newspapers across the country, including The Washington Post, The Washington Times, Washington Examiner, and the San Francisco Examiner. His work has also appeared in National Review Online, The Weekly Standard Online, American Spectator, and WORLD magazine. He is a regular contributor and blogger for American Spectator Online and for the Cooler Heads Coalition blog.

Chesser has also appeared on NBC's "The Today Show," and as a talk radio guest on stations across the country.

Chesser came to North Carolina in 1995 from Los Angeles, where he worked in accounting for both private business and a nonprofit organization. He grew up in Rhode Island.


Articles by Paul Chesser

(6.15.12) Balance Needed on Coverage of Sea Level Rise
The costs of adjusting to purported increases in sea level have been left out of major news stories.


(6.18.09) Easley evasions should not surprise
Often when a public official is suspected (indicted, convicted) of misbehavior, observers ask, “How could this happen to such a good man (or woman)?” Or the political chatterers bemoan how, once again, power is intoxicating ether.


(6.12.09) Easley’s Behavior Shouldn’t Surprise
Often when a public official is suspected (indicted, convicted) of misbehavior, observers ask, “How could this happen to such a good man (or woman)?” Or the political chatterers bemoan how, once again, power is intoxicating ether.


(12.19.07) Foundations Connected to CAPAG Management
RALEIGH — Foundations that promote a troubling forecast from the threat of global warming might be more intimately involved than previously known with North Carolina’s hired directors for its Climate Action Plan Advisory Group.


(12.04.07) Forestry Leader Sees Enviro Upside
RALEIGH – A member of North Carolina’s Legislative Commission on Global Climate Change said yesterday that recommendations coming from a study group could potentially help his industry, but he is concerned that no cost-benefit analysis is being conducted on the options under consideration.


(11.14.07) State Agency, University Deny Records Requests
RALEIGH — The North Carolina Climate Action Plan Advisory Group proclaims its commitment to “transparency,” but when asked by Carolina Journal to provide data and analysis by its consultant, the state-appointed panel had little information to offer.


(11.06.07) Brad Miller Battles Over Polar Bears
RALEIGH — U.S. Rep. Brad Miller (D-NC) has picked a fight with Alaska over the state’s refusal to protect polar bears as an endangered species. Alaska's Republican Gov. Sarah Palin, however, disputes Miller, saying his “unfounded criticism could chill scientific debate.”


(10.24.07) No Cost-Benefit on Recommendations
RALEIGH — A consultant to North Carolina’s Climate Action Plan Advisory Group yesterday acknowledged that his organization has conducted no cost-benefit analysis of recommendations CAPAG has made to a special legislative commission on global warming.


(10.02.07) CCS Joins Clinton Global Initiative
RALEIGH – The Center for Climate Strategies, which is finalizing recommendations for North Carolina to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, announced over the weekend that it would perform similar work on a national scale as part of the Clinton Global Initiative, an ambitious effort sponsored by a foundation named for the former U.S. president.


(8.15.07) Johnson & Wales Is Halfway There
RALEIGH – While it didn't fulfill the $10 million promise in state money that disgraced former House Speaker Jim Black committed in 2002, the General Assembly gave Johnson & Wales University another $2 million in this year's budget, which nudges the culinary school more than halfway toward its goal.


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