Category: Books and the Arts

  • Facebook caught up in vilification of entrepreneurs, enterprises  

    I have found the recent demonization of Facebook and its founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg fascinating and revelatory. We have discovered that during the 2016 presidential campaign the social media giant played unwitting host to hundreds of Russian bots and fake accounts peddling misinformation about the candidates. It has also attracted bad…

  • World without walls: virtual reality’s role in the classroom 

    It’s a world without walls. Students can explore the vast expanse of the Great Barrier Reef or the microscopic intricacies of the human cell — all within the confines of the classroom. Virtual reality experiences take students “to where they cannot be” because of physical, financial, or other constraints, says Helen Crompton, an…

  • Economic freedom, press freedom go hand in hand

    Freedom of the press and the freedom to operate in a free and open market is critical to maintaining the ideals of liberty and democracy. Those points are unassailable. Going further, snarky, mean-spirited and even physically threatening attacks on credible journalists must stop.

  • Innovative School District: A promising idea for improving schools 

    In 2016, the General Assembly passed a bill that created the Achievement School District — later changed to the Innovative School District or ISD — which was tasked to coordinate the transfer of up to five persistently low-performing district schools to a charter school operator. The purpose of the legislation was straightforward — assist district schools that…

  • Protecting our investments in North Carolina 

    Protecting our investments means taking care of what we own.  As state taxpayers, we own a lot of stuff — office, school and university buildings, state agencies and department offices, courthouses, prisons, libraries, books … and lots of land. North Carolina owns 42 parks, a symphony orchestra, a zoo, and seven history and two art museums.   …

  • UNC-CH professor Mitch Prinstein discusses the power of popularity

    Mitch Prinstein, John Van Seters distinguished professor and director of clinical psychology at UNC-Chapel Hill, shares key themes from his book, Popular: The Power of Likability in a Status-Obsessed World. Prinstein offered these comments during an interview for Carolina Journal Radio.

  • Summer reading: It schools the mind

    Languid summer days are near at hand. For students finishing the traditional academic year, time — free and fallow — beckons. But as days slip into weeks and months, something else accrues alongside rest and refreshment: a skills drop-off that erodes learning gains. Low-income students are most at risk. Unlike…