Category: Taxes and Budget

  • A Good Idea from Charlotte

    Yes, the Queen City occasionally has something to teach the rest of the state — this time the lesson is about using private contractors to deliver Medicaid services more efficiently.

  • First in Bloat

    Two studies out this week confirm that North Carolina leads most of the South in taxes and spending, with our state and local tax burden now significantly higher than the tax burden in so-called "Taxachusetts."…

  • What Is College Worth?

    If a college education offers the kinds of financial returns that students are promised, why isn't it valuable enough to pay a reasonable price for?…

  • What Big Budget Cuts?

    Even after Gov. Easley's budget-reductions this year, the FY 2001-02 budget is about $14 billion, compared with $7.8 billion in spending 10 years ago. The result of all that supposed dieting looks more like Richard Simmons than Kate Moss.

  • Easley to Mayors: Stick It

    After inviting the mayors of North Carolina's largest cities to come up with ways to balance the state budget without using local revenues, Mike Easley greeted their sound proposal yesterday with a loud and rude “no.”…

  • Tax Cuts Don’t Cost, They Save

    Last year some were saying that a new federal tax cut for business would “cost” North Carolina $479 million over three years. No, it would save us $479 million and create thousands of new jobs. Calling a tax cut a “cost” is perverse.

  • Throw Taxpayers from the Train

    While the state faces a budget crunch and Congress considers cutting off subsidies, Amtrak boosters in NC are pushing for two new inter-city rail routes to Asheville and Wilmington. What's next, stagecoach rides?…

  • Time for a Margin Call

    North Carolina’s top income tax rate is now 6th highest in the nation. Such a high marginal tax rate on income-generating activity is the wrong message to send as the state seeks to recover from economic recession.

  • Research Devil’s Triangle

    Boosters of government research subsidies accept uncritically the idea that more taxpayer spending means higher economic returns. Unfortunately, this simplistic model is being used to defend UNC and special-interest pork from budget cuts.