Opinion (Page 670)

  • Call. 21: Study Urges UNC to Slow Down on Bond

    The Pope Center for Higher Education Policy this week released a Spotlight showing why the UNC system should not rely on bonds to finance the UNC system's construction costs and highlighting better ways to address construction needs. The report poses questions that it says all citizens and legislators should ask…

  • Call. 20: UNC-Chapel Hill one of highest-paying public universities, study finds

    The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill pays professors the fifth-highest average salary among public universities of its kind, a study by the Pope Center for Higher Education Policy has found. The other Research I institution in North Carolina, North Carolina State University, also pays its professors well comparatively,…

  • Call. 19: Bonds: The Anwer to UNC’s Construction Cost?

    Bonds may not be the best answer to UNC's rising construction cost, according to a recent analysis by the Pope Center for Higher Education Policy. The report comes in the wake of a proposal by the UNC Board of Governors to meet the university's construction needs by allowing the UNC-system…

  • Call. 17: UNC Sets Sights on New Funding Sources

    The UNC Board of Governer's meeting on May 14 led to the approval of two financial "tools" that could change the way that UNC pays back construction bonds, according to Associated Press reports. The tools are included in two legislative bills that should reach the General Assembly within weeks.

  • Call. 16: ‘Will UNC Ever Take Privatization Seriously’?

    A new study by the Pope Center for Higher Education Policy finds that the UNC system uses criteria that inhibit its ability to contract out various services. These criteria, known as "outsourcing criteria/guidelines," apply to all UNC-system schools and were recently part of the Outsourcing Steering Committee's decision not to…

  • Call. 15: Duke University’s Slow Response to Death Threats Raises Questions

    A barrage of hate mail, physical confrontations and death threats at Duke University has prompted suprisingly little reaction from a school that prides itself on tolerence and diversity. The trouble began when two freshmen, Berin Szoka and Jay Strader, submitted a series of op-editorials to The Chronicle, Duke's student newspaper,…

  • Call. 13: Public Acceptance of Lying Extends to the Triangle

    According to the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative organization based in Washington D.C., public acceptance of lying in academe has increased in recent years. The May-June issue of AEI's magazine, The American Enterprise, includes several articles that blame postmodern scholarship on this recent trend.