Archives: Andy Taylor

  • Can Biden resist deeper attacks on capitalism?

    Much has already been written about Joe Biden’s presidency. His plans that will expand the size and scope of the federal government receive the most attention. Biden quickly pushed a $1.9 trillion coronavirus relief package through Congress, despite unanimous Republican opposition. This was on top of $3 trillion of relief…

  • Ever-changing congressional districts portend interesting results 

    Last year, a Superior Court panel in North Carolina declared the state’s congressional districts an unconstitutional partisan gerrymander. As I noted in a previous column, this was an egregious abuse of judicial power. No matter, it is done. We should now look forward and examine the effects the…

  • The thorny issue of slavery reparations 

    This summer’s racial protests and violence have propelled the issue of slavery reparations under the national spotlight. It is a central feature of the list of demands forwarded by the Movement for Black Lives — a coalition of “Black Lives Matter” and other related groups. For the first time…

  • The great debate: To wear or not to wear? 

    It’s trite to say the country is divided. It’s a presidential election year and the racially charged protests over police conduct ended whatever fleeting moment of national unity there was in the age of coronavirus. Splits along racial, generational, and ideological lines run deep, and much ink…

  • No more water’s edge: All politics are domestic  

    Most presidents have an intelligible foreign policy. For some it’s bold enough to earn a grandiose name — think George H.W. Bush’s “New World Order” — or at least be labeled “doctrine.” James Monroe’s was to keep other powers out…

  • Conservatives might need a dose of the 1970s  

    The times have a fin de siècle feel for small-government conservatives. The Republican Party is now “owned” by Donald Trump who, in his first year, increased government expenditures by 86% over the last budget proposed by George W. Bush in 2008. The self-professed “king of debt” requested…

  • Redistricting, gerrymandering, and legislating from the bench 

    I have written about gerrymandering in these pages before, but the recent Superior Court ruling that the state’s legislative districts constitute an unconstitutional partisan gerrymander makes me want to do it again.    This is a prime example of judicial overreach and regrettable encroachment of quantitative social…

  • Putting rightward nature of political polarization to rest 

    Partisan polarization has been a fixture of American politics for several decades now.  Recently, analysts have argued it’s asymmetric. To be sure, Democrats have moved to the left. But they have not drifted from the middle ground as much as Republicans have to the right. …

  • SCOTUS showing subtleties of jurisprudence  

    We tend to think of U.S. Supreme Court justices as ideological, their views and actions mapping neatly onto the conventional liberal-to-conservative continuum of American politics. Their decisions are thought to conform to the party of the president who nominated them. The current conservative bloc is Chief Justice John Roberts…