Print Editions

  • Volume 10, Number 10 – August 2001

    Cover • Why does conservative talk radio con-tinue to thrive, especially in North Caro-lina? The answer is part Rush inspiration; and part public participation. One example of conservative chat’s influence resulted in the recent Taxpayer Tea Party at the legis-lature, which was led by WPTF’s Jerry Agar. Page 1 North…

  • Volume 10, Number 9 – July 2001

    Cover • In June, Charlotte voters overwhelmingly defeated a proposal to spend $342 million to build a new coliseum for the Charlotte Hornets and supplement several local arts and cultural projects. The Charlotte vote represents a defining moment in the relationship between N.C. governments and major league sports teams. How did…

  • Volume 10, Number 8 – June 2001

    Cover • UNC officials have said for years that higher salaries elsewhere are luring our best professors away. Is it true? And remember how the UNC bond package passed last year was not supposed to cause a tax in-crease? Lawmakers now want tax hikes. Co-incidence? Page 1 North Carolina •…

  • Volume 10, Number 7 – May 2001

    Cover • The state’s budget woes have prompted serious attempts to reform the tax code. Lawmakers and policy experts have busied themselves this spring with trying to figure out how the tax code got to be such a complex mess and how the state can make it more fair and…

  • Volume 10, Number 5 – March 2001

    Cover • Superior Court Judge Howard Manning last fall ruled that North Carolina was required to fund a pre-school program for “at-risk” children. Some lawmakers want to transform Smart Start into that program. But Smart Start officials say that would do children a major disservice. Page 1 North Carolina •…

  • Volume 10, Number 4 – February 2001

    Cover • North Carolina has spent the past 15 years pursuing economic development through an “interventionist” model. But that model is being increasingly challenged by those who prefer a “competition” model. Gov. Mike Easley must choose which model will shape the state’s economic development policy in the next four years.

  • Volume 10, Number 3 – January 2001

    Cover • North Carolina faces a $468 million budget shortfall this fiscal year and $490 million next fiscal year. At the same time, lawmakers, Gov.-elect Mike Easley, and a Wake Count judge have proposed a host of new initiatives they want to fund. State budget writers say they will cut…