Carolina Journal Print Edition

Volume 10, Number 9 – July 2001

• In June, Charlotte voters overwhelmingly defeated a proposal to spend $342 million to build a new coliseum for the Charlotte Hornets and supplement several local arts and cultural projects. The Charlotte vote represents a defining moment in the relationship between N.C. governments and major league sports teams. How did it happen, and what will it mean? Page 1

• The John Locke Foundation’s arguments against continued state funding of the Global TransPark in Kinston have renewed debate on the project. Page 4
• A sales tax hike could cost North Carolina thousands of jobs, according to a study by the John Locke Foundation. Page 5
• Safety zealots finally won passage of a bill requiring children to wear bicycle helmets, but their record on gun control this session has been more mixed. Page 5

• Reading Recovery has found its way into North Carolina public schools despite evidence that it doesn’t work. Page 6
• A federal program will provide some North Carolina schools with funds of up to $100,000 to restructure themselves to improve performance. Page 7
• Paige Holland summarizes some positive results of private involvement in the public schools. Page 7
• Surplus federal computers are winding up in public school classrooms. Page 8
• N.C. public schools are finding that getting parents and the community involved in the schools is helping to close the racial achievement gap. Page 9

• In the face of a lawsuit, the UNC Board of Governors voted to end rather than defend a quota-based selection policy. Page 10
• Microsoft ruling pleases N.C. State University economist. Page 10
• North Carolina research universities rank among the nation’s elite. Page 11
• George Leef says state university budgets need more scrutiny. Page 11
• Technology aids cheaters and those who want to catch them. Page 12
• A U.S. Supreme Court ruling could have a major impact on Title IX implementation on college campuses. Page 13
• Another U.S. Supreme Court ruling hurts the cause of race-based preferences in campus admissions. Page 13

• The Town of Davidson imposes a harsh land-use policy in an area where residents cannot fight back. Page 14
• Counties and cities across North Carolina are raising taxes and fees. Page 15
• In some cases, growth pays for itself, say some studies. Page 16
• One on one with Pamlico County Commissioner Christine Mele. Page 16
• Convention centers, annexation, and property theft concern residents across North Carolina. Page 17

• Roy Cordato argues that the Baby Boomer generation has always been self-centered and has never really cared for individual liberty. Page 18
• Reviews of Polk’s Folly by William Polk and the new Steven Spielberg film, A.I. Page 19

• Editorials on standardized testing and redistricting. Page 20
• Editorials on beach renourishment and the Charlotte Hornets. Page 21
• Andrew Cline says that Gov. Mike Easley is playing reverse Robin Hood. Page 22
• Michael Walden looks at property tax collection in North Carolina. Page 23
• Marc Rotterman says a new visitor’s center at the U.S. Capitol is overdue. Page 23

• Politicians unveail a new version of the Ten Commandments. Page 24