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February 2005

• At one time, Robert Boren held hopes of becoming a graduate student at North Carolina State University. But that was before he ran afoul of a professor, had his grades changed, was denied entry into graduate school, and was charged with trespassing. Page 1

• Eastern North Carolina Natural Gas is winding down its pipeline construction project in 14 northeastern counties with an ambitious crossing of Currituck Sound, a three-mile underground tunneling that parallels Wright Memorial Bridge. Page 4
• Gov. Mike Easley and state Senate President Pro Tem Marc Basnight are locked in a fight over a small airport in Currituck County. Page 5

• It’s time for medical HMOs to step aside, because the educational market, with an estimated $350 billion potential value, is ready to let EMOs make their debut. Page 6
• Recently released test results showed that the most advanced American students compared unfavorably with their peers in other countries, underlining the importance of providing appropriate education to the most gifted students. Page 8
• Two recent studies examined curriculum and teaching practices in K-12 English and math, and find that even the best states often come up short. Page 9

• While Title IX has provided more opportunities in athletics for women, it has done the opposite for men. Page 10
• Given the U.S. Supreme Court’s failure to clarify the constitutionality of racial preferences, the issue continues to roil nationwide. Page 11
• Jon Sanders writes that the Foundation for Individual Liberty’s Guide to Free Speech on Campus gives a shot in the arm to academic freedom. Page 11
• Parades, music, drama, prayer breakfasts, and speakers helped University of North Carolina schools celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Page 12

• Clint Willis isn’t bitter toward Scotland County voters, even though they didn’t re-elect him to the county Board of Commissioners. He regrets only that he couldn’t put the brakes on residents’ growing property tax burden. Page 14
• Good news is the cause of bad news for local government and civic leaders when it comes to the state’s yearly William S. Lee Act tier designations, in which a stronger local economy can reduce incentives for business investing in and state aid to a county. Page 15
• Chad Adams says if you compete with Dell in North Carolina, you are subsidizing your competition simply because you’re paying taxes that Dell won’t have to pay. Page 15
• An interview with University of North Carolina sociology professor Dr. Christian Smith. Page 17

• Paul Messino reviews the book State of Fear by Michael Crichton. Page 18
• Reviews of Who’s Looking Out for You? by Bill O’Reilly, and For the Survival of Democracy: Franklin Roosevelt and the World Crisis of the 1930s by Alonzo Hamby. Page 19

• Paul Chesser writes that Jim Goodmon, owner of Capitol Broadcasting, is just your standard, decent guy. Page 20
• Editorials about pollution trends in North Carolina and mathematics performance among U.S. teens. Page 21
• Michael Walden writes that the demise of the federal tobacco program is a prime example of the ultimate triumph of economic forces over political control. Page 22
• George Leef writes that out-of-state tuition is a bargain at the University of North Carolina, and that the state’s taxpayers deserve a break because of it. Page 23

• CJ Parody: A study by the Office of State Personnel revealed that women make less than men and female-dominated occupations are ”often paid less than male-dominated jobs even if they require the same or greater amount of education, experience, and responsibilities.” Page 24

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February 2005 - Carolina Journal
Print Edition

February 2005

• At one time, Robert Boren held hopes of becoming a graduate student at North Carolina State University. But that was before he ran afoul of a professor, had his grades changed, was denied entry into graduate school, and was charged with trespassing. Page 1

• Eastern North Carolina Natural Gas is winding down its pipeline construction project in 14 northeastern counties with an ambitious crossing of Currituck Sound, a three-mile underground tunneling that parallels Wright Memorial Bridge. Page 4
• Gov. Mike Easley and state Senate President Pro Tem Marc Basnight are locked in a fight over a small airport in Currituck County. Page 5

• It’s time for medical HMOs to step aside, because the educational market, with an estimated $350 billion potential value, is ready to let EMOs make their debut. Page 6
• Recently released test results showed that the most advanced American students compared unfavorably with their peers in other countries, underlining the importance of providing appropriate education to the most gifted students. Page 8
• Two recent studies examined curriculum and teaching practices in K-12 English and math, and find that even the best states often come up short. Page 9

• While Title IX has provided more opportunities in athletics for women, it has done the opposite for men. Page 10
• Given the U.S. Supreme Court’s failure to clarify the constitutionality of racial preferences, the issue continues to roil nationwide. Page 11
• Jon Sanders writes that the Foundation for Individual Liberty’s Guide to Free Speech on Campus gives a shot in the arm to academic freedom. Page 11
• Parades, music, drama, prayer breakfasts, and speakers helped University of North Carolina schools celebrate Martin Luther King Jr. Day. Page 12

• Clint Willis isn’t bitter toward Scotland County voters, even though they didn’t re-elect him to the county Board of Commissioners. He regrets only that he couldn’t put the brakes on residents’ growing property tax burden. Page 14
• Good news is the cause of bad news for local government and civic leaders when it comes to the state’s yearly William S. Lee Act tier designations, in which a stronger local economy can reduce incentives for business investing in and state aid to a county. Page 15
• Chad Adams says if you compete with Dell in North Carolina, you are subsidizing your competition simply because you’re paying taxes that Dell won’t have to pay. Page 15
• An interview with University of North Carolina sociology professor Dr. Christian Smith. Page 17

• Paul Messino reviews the book State of Fear by Michael Crichton. Page 18
• Reviews of Who’s Looking Out for You? by Bill O’Reilly, and For the Survival of Democracy: Franklin Roosevelt and the World Crisis of the 1930s by Alonzo Hamby. Page 19

• Paul Chesser writes that Jim Goodmon, owner of Capitol Broadcasting, is just your standard, decent guy. Page 20
• Editorials about pollution trends in North Carolina and mathematics performance among U.S. teens. Page 21
• Michael Walden writes that the demise of the federal tobacco program is a prime example of the ultimate triumph of economic forces over political control. Page 22
• George Leef writes that out-of-state tuition is a bargain at the University of North Carolina, and that the state’s taxpayers deserve a break because of it. Page 23

• CJ Parody: A study by the Office of State Personnel revealed that women make less than men and female-dominated occupations are ”often paid less than male-dominated jobs even if they require the same or greater amount of education, experience, and responsibilities.” Page 24

Latest Issues