Tag:certificate of need

  • House members take another stab at certificate-of-need reform

    A bipartisan group of House members hopes to break a regulatory chokehold on surgical facilities. Reps. Billy Richardson, D-Cumberland; Ed Goodwin, R-Chowan; and David Rogers, R-Rutherford, on Tuesday, April 16, filed House Bill 857. The bill abolishes certificate-of-need laws preventing standalone…

  • Lawmakers can reduce health costs

    If Medicaid expansion forces taxpayers to pick up the tab for a service that was either previously paid for some other way or not consumed in the first place, there is no reduction in the cost of care.

  • How to expand insurance coverage without expanding Medicaid

    The state treasurer and the N.C. Healthcare Association can’t reach consensus over how to pay for health insurance for state employees. The governor and some legislative leaders are advocating Medicaid expansion to cover an additional 600,000 people, which would cost the state roughly $600 million the first two years. The…

  • N.C. Certificate of Need laws continue causing pain

    In yesterday’s Daily Journal, I wrote about Certificate of Need laws. The issue moved from the theoretical to the concrete for me as I spent the past week nursing my husband through a pretty painful kidney stone and associated blockage. Every few hours, I administered more opioids. He missed…

  • Clock running out on certificate-of-need reform for 2017 NCGA session

    Certificate-of-need reforms were left out of the final budget compromise passed by the General Assembly. But backers aren’t giving up on curtailing or ending the regulation that forces medical providers to get permission from the government to make major new investments. Sen. Ralph Hise, R-Mitchell, successfully inserted a phased-in…

  • Repeal Certificate of Need so patients have better access to health care 

    Patients deserve better access to both life-saving and life-preserving health-care treatments. Which means physicians, hospitals, and other health care facilities should be able to invest in their communities to address unmet patient demand for critical services such as kidney dialysis units, cost-effective surgery, neonatal intensive care units, nursing homes, and much, much, more.