Tag:raise the age

  • ‘Raise the age’ provision part of House-Senate budget deal

    RALEIGH — The General Assembly’s compromise budget plan funds House Bill 280, which would raise the age of many juvenile offenders from 16 to 18. The General Assembly has allocated $1 million to implement the plan, and $13.4 million to build a new juvenile detention facility. The N.C. Department of…

  • Budget builds on conservative success

    Since 2010, when Republicans won their first majorities in both legislative chambers in modern times, they’ve consistently pursued a conservative approach to fiscal policy and state government.

  • Chief justice touts potential benefits of N.C. judicial reforms

    The top officer in the judicial branch of N.C. government is looking at major changes in the way state courts function in the future. Most are designed to increase transparency and improve public access to courts and court documents. N.C. Supreme Court Chief Justice Mark Martin discussed those changes, recommended…

  • Chief justice speaks about raise-the-age, judicial reform

    Mark Martin was elected chief justice of the North Carolina Supreme Court in November 2014, three months after Gov. Pat McCrory appointed him to serve the remainder of retiring Chief Justice Sarah Parker’s term. Two years ago, Martin, who has served on the court since 1999, convened the North Carolina…

  • House overwhelmingly backs Raise the Age initiative

    From Carolina Journal Radio Program No. 734: The Raise the Age initiative reached a significant milestone when the N.C. House voted, 104-8, to approve the idea. The legislation would treat nonviolent 16- and 17-year-old criminal offenders as juveniles rather than adults. You’ll hear highlights from the House’s debate on…

  • ‘Raise the Age’ overwhelmingly passes House

    RALEIGH — North Carolina is one step closer toward raising the age for juvenile offenders. House Bill 280, Juvenile Justice Reinvestment Act, on May 17 passed the state House in a sweeping 104-8 vote. The bill would move 16- and-17-year-old nonviolent offenders…

  • ‘Raise the age’ one step closer to passage

    RALEIGH — A legislative effort to “raise the age” for some juvenile offenders has instead raised concerns about costs. Most lawmakers agree that, in most cases, 16- and 17-year-0lds should not be criminalized as adults, but the impact on taxpayers of leaving those kids in the juvenile…