CJ Radio

  • Research identifies traits of successful teachers

    From Carolina Journal Radio Program No. 739: New research offers clues about the primary factors that go into making a public school teacher effective. Terry Stoops, the John Locke Foundation’s vice president for research, examines the data. He explains how the research fits with recent legislative efforts to change…

  • Agriculture remains major driver of N.C. economy

    From Carolina Journal Radio Program No. 739: Agriculture remains one of North Carolina’s largest businesses. Rep. Jimmy Dixon, R-Duplin, has served as one of the General Assembly’s top advocates for agricultural issues in recent years. Dixon shares his thoughts about the current state of farming and agribusiness, along with…

  • Younger N.C. lawmakers form Future Caucus

    From Carolina Journal Radio Program No. 739: Members of the General Assembly tend to be older than the state’s general population. But a handful of lawmakers younger than 45 have decided to form a new group. It’s called the North Carolina Future Caucus. It will take a bipartisan look…

  • Regular session complete, lawmakers head back to Raleigh in August

    From Carolina Journal Radio Program No. 739: North Carolina lawmakers have adjourned their regular “long” session, but that doesn’t mean they have finished work for the year. They plan to return to Raleigh in early August and again in September. Rick Henderson, Carolina Journal editor-in-chief, explains why lawmakers have…

  • Convention of States idea attracts high-profile support

    From Carolina Journal Radio Program No. 738: Some North Carolina lawmakers have shown interest in having this state join 12 others in supporting a Convention of States. That’s an option provided in Article V of the U.S. Constitution for states to initiate constitutional amendments. During a recent visit to…

  • Civil asset forfeiture can threaten property rights

    From Carolina Journal Radio Program No. 738: Civil asset forfeiture allows law enforcement agencies to take property from people suspected of illegal activity, even if they never face criminal charges. The process is open to abuse. Darpana Sheth, senior attorney with the Institute for Justice, explains why civil asset…