News

N.C. Supreme Court Democrats order forced money transfer for Leandro spending

The N.C. Supreme Court is ordering state government officials to transfer what is likely to be hundreds of millions of dollars out of the state’s treasury to fund a court-ordered education plan. In a 4-3 party-line vote, the court’s Democratic justices overruled Republican colleagues and rejected Republican lawmakers’ arguments in the long-running Leandro case. GOP lawmakers had argued that a forced money transfer would violate the state constitution’s separation of powers.

CJ Staff
Video

Former U.S. Sen. Phil Gramm explains ‘The Myth of American Inequality’

Former U.S. Sen. Phil Gramm discusses his book, “The Myth of American Inequality: How Government Biases Policy Debate.” Gramm and co-authors Robert Ekelund and John Early argue that the official Census measure of household income skews policy debates. That measure excludes all noncash income, leaving out two-thirds of government transfer payments.

Mitch Kokai
News

Bonds and sales-tax hikes on the ballot in 20+ NC counties

During this November’s midterm elections, five counties will vote on a referendum to raise their county’s sales tax by a quarter of a percent. Many other counties are proposing bond referendums to fund various projects within their counties. 

Brayden Marsh
News

Republicans: Inflation costs each N.C. family $7,800 a year

North Carolina Republicans are driving their message as they head into the homestretch of the 2022 midterm elections. At the party headquarters on Thursday, Sen. Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., spoke to media and party faithful urging them to keep the energy up and their focus on education and the impact of inflation.

Donna King
News

Bishop joins 55 other Republicans opposing Democrats’ temporary spending plan

Ninth District U.S. Rep. Dan Bishop has signed on to one of two letters urging Republican congressional colleagues to reject Democrats’ latest temporary federal spending plan. Bishop is the only member of the N.C. delegation to sign the letters. “Congress should not be a rubber stamp for the destructive Biden agenda,” Bishop told Carolina Journal...

CJ Staff

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Opinion

Myths and facts about the Inflation Reduction Act

BACKGROUND The “Inflation Reduction Act” spends hundreds of billions of dollars on President Biden’s wish list. It pays for it with big new taxes on big corporations. It imposes a new 15% minimum tax. Supposedly this is a tax on the “wealthy.” It isn’t.  On January 21, 2018, the nominal federal corporate income tax rate...

Paul Stam
News

Folwell touts $7 billion drop in State Health Plan retiree liability

North Carolina has seen a $7 billion improvement over the past year in the shortfall for government retirees’ health benefits. That’s according to a new report from The Segal Group. State Treasurer Dale Folwell touted the report in a news release.

CJ Staff
Opinion

Student loan forgiveness signals more national decline

Of all the bad economic policies I’ve seen in government — and boy, let me tell you, I’ve seen a lot — the decision to “forgive” student debt is, by far, the worst by degrees of comparison. It is intellectually dishonest, it is morally indefensible, and it screams louder than any other thing the Biden administration has done, that...

Woody White
News

Split N.C. Supreme Court orders more scrutiny of local water, sewer ‘capacity’ fees

The N.C. Supreme Court has split, 4-3, on whether Harnett County should be forced to prove that its water and sewer “capacity use” fees could be distinguished from an unconstitutional taking of private property. The majority reversed decisions from a trial judge and a unanimous N.C. Court of Appeals panel favoring the county. The state’s highest court has ordered a trial judge to conduct further hearings.

CJ Staff
News

N.C. Supreme Court rules against ‘gerrymandered’ legislature, punts on fate of voter ID and tax cap amendments

With a party-line 4-3 vote, Democrats on the N.C. Supreme Court have ruled that voter-approved state constitutional amendments could be tossed because they were placed on the ballot by a “gerrymandered” legislature. Republican justices objected. Though Friday's decision did not officially kill the amendments, “the majority nullifies the will of the people and precludes governance by the majority,” according to dissenters.

CJ Staff