Tag:Gov. Roy Cooper

  • Government won’t solve opioid crisis

    Opioid addiction can be fatal, but government policies would probably make a bad situation worse, many experts say.    Rising rates of opioid abuse led President Trump recently to declare a national emergency. Critics of the current approach insist state and federal officials continually use misuse the word “epidemic.”  …

  • Elections/ethics board ruling could be bad news for governor

    Earlier this week, a three-judge state Superior Court panel delivered what may be a body blow to part of Gov. Roy Cooper’s goal of reclaiming power from the Republican-dominated General Assembly. The state Supreme Court soon may bring a haymaker — while staying faithful to its constitutional duties as an…

  • Skepticism is healthy, but political posturing is not 

    Since 2011, the Republican-led General Assembly has enacted transformational reforms. These include changes to our tax structure, how we pay for infrastructure, and more options for parents when choosing schools for their children. My colleagues and others have written extensively over the past seven years of the details and the benefits these reforms have had to the state’s economy, its business…

  • Constitutional amendment would shrink judicial terms immediately

    Legislative Republicans vowed to offer changes in the way North Carolinians select judges. Tuesday afternoon, they rolled out a big one. A few hours after the House rejected the governor’s veto of a bill canceling judicial primaries in 2018, the House and Senate Rules Committee chairmen proposed a constitutional amendment…

  • Cooper vetoes election measure, signs film subsidy bill

    The 2017-18 General Assembly may soon try to keep alive its unblemished record of overriding Gov. Roy Cooper’s vetoes. Cooper on Monday vetoed the 13th bill since he took office in January, nixing Senate Bill 656, an election-reform measure which would ease ballot access for minor parties and unaffiliated candidates and…

  • What to expect during this week’s legislative session

    Another session of the N.C. General Assembly — this one especially short — should convene at noon Oct. 4. In an email last week, House Speaker Rep. Tim Moore, R-Cleveland, told House Republicans to expect to be in Raleigh for three days, starting Wednesday. And, says Moore in the email,…