Tag:schools

  • Bonds or Back to Basics?

    What’s the best way to cope with overcrowded classrooms and aging school buildings? For many school systems in North Carolina, constructing bright and shiny new schools – funded by school bonds – is the remedy of choice for our statewide facilities crisis.

  • Education Solutions Remain Elusive

    RALEIGH — For years, public school students in North Carolina have been subjected to newer math benchmarks that favor estimation over exactitude, promoting the notion that close enough is good enough.

  • Tough to Decipher Administrator Pay

    RALEIGH — While it pays to be a school administrator in North Carolina — in many cases, very well, the employment deals offered to school system bureaucrats are woven into an intricate and multilayered state compensation system that can be difficult to decipher for those who fund it: North Carolina…

  • Rural Schools Face Enrollment Decline

    RALEIGH — Counter to what urban schools have struggled to endure, most rural counties in North Carolina have had to contend with declining enrollment since 1997. Forty-six of 85 rural counties in the state have incurred a steady decline in the student population over the years. One of the hardest-hit…

  • Special-Needs Kids Fall Through Cracks

    RALEIGH — It’s official. Over the past several years the fissure in the educational system in North Carolina has widened, leaving special-needs children with the highest potential of falling through the academic cracks. Roger Gerber, president of North Carolina School Choice, says that without a free, open-market competition, including vouchers…

  • Court: Parking Lot Not A Building

    RALEIGH — Local zoning decisions are often contentious. This is especially true when they pit different local government authorities against each other. In a case decided April 5, the N.C. Court of Appeals ruled on whether the city of Rocky Mount had the authority to impose zoning restrictions on a…

  • ’63 Law Ups Scotland’s Tax Bite

    RALEIGH — Clint Willis isn’t bitter toward Scotland County voters, even though they didn’t re-elect him to the county Board of Commissioners in November. He regrets only that he couldn’t put the brakes on residents’ growing property-tax burden. His hard feelings are reserved for what he thinks helped get him…