Category: State Government

  • Time for a Margin Call

    North Carolina’s top income tax rate is now 6th highest in the nation. Such a high marginal tax rate on income-generating activity is the wrong message to send as the state seeks to recover from economic recession.

  • Research Devil’s Triangle

    Boosters of government research subsidies accept uncritically the idea that more taxpayer spending means higher economic returns. Unfortunately, this simplistic model is being used to defend UNC and special-interest pork from budget cuts.

  • Now That’s a Legislature

    If N.C. House members represented the same number of citizens as do their counterparts in Vermont or New Hampshire, we could have 2,222 representatives in that body. Sound ridiculous? But the body couldn't meet often or long enough to do any real damage.

  • Liberal Groups to Grow

    Despite having far more lucrative sources of funds, leftist groups will continue to be viewed as outgunned, outmanned, and closer to average citizens than conservatives, though the opposite is far closer to the truth.

  • Easley Didn’t Need This Publicity

    Rather than cutting revenues to local governments -- and thus transforming an inside-the-Beltline story about a $1 billion state budget deficit into hot local news -- the governor should have tapped reserves with fewer statewide constituents.

  • Republicans and Overconfidence

    The national GOP is basking in the glow of sky-high poll numbers for President Bush, modest gains from redistricting, and leads in party identification. But it is long time until November.

  • Does Easley Favor More Taxes?

    At a recent speech in Greensboro, the governor seemed to suggest giving localities the ability to raise sales taxes by $400 million starting in July — imposing yet more of a burden on a state economy already in serious trouble.

  • More on Economic Diversity

    New research provides empirical support for an earlier column about North Carolina’s dangerous reliance on a few key industries. The state ranks low (8th out of 11 Southern states) in the diversity of its industrial base.